Lake Winnipeg, Fishing Information and Stuff to Know

Lake Winnipeg, Lake Winnipeg is located in southern Manitoba, Canada. A remnant of Agassiz, a prehistoric glacial lake, Lake Winnipeg is 428km ( 266 miles ) long and covers 24, 390sq.km ( 9417sq. miles ) Making it the 3rd largest lake in Canada and seventh largest in North America.

Fed by many rivers including the Red, Winnipeg and Saskatchewan rivers, Lake Winnipeg is drained by the Nelson River which empties into Hudson Bay. Because of the lake's shallowness, its water is emptied and replenished every 3-4 and one half years. This rapid replacement and regeneration makes Lake Winnipeg one of the most fertile fishing lakes in the world.Historically, Lake Winnipeg has played a vital role in Canada's economic and social histories, being the centre of the fur trade's three hub lakes, ( the others being Lake Superior to the east and Lake Athabaska to the west ) , and being the link to the nation's crossroads.Taking it's name from the Cree word for "turbid or murky waters" Lake Winnipeg is unique in that it changes appearances and plays a variety of roles.For some Lake Winnipeg has been described as the "Prairie Sea" due to it's sheer vastness and magnificence, it is home to Canada's largest inland commercial fishery, providing livelihoods for close to 1000 fishers and producing 4.2 million kilograms of fish annually.For others it is the "Holiday Lake", playing a significant role as a summer playground where numerous cottage enclaves dot the southern shore along with beautiful white silica sand beaches.Yet others refer to it as the "Island Lake" where at least 638 islands appear through out the lake, 399 of them unnamed, all with vegetation. The islands change the appearance of the lake for travelers virtually transporting them into a bevy of rocks, pines and outcrops reminiscent of Northwestern Ontario.Lake Winnipeg features other unique attractions such as the massive limestone cliffs on Punk Island and Grindstone point.

Rent a Summer Cottage:
Cottage at Lake Winnipeg

Author: Fredrick Buetefuer